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    2009 Health-and-wellness Industry Sales Hit $125 Billion

    Retail sales within the U.S. consumer packaged goods health-and-wellness industry reached almost $125 billion in 2009, representing an overall growth of 5 percent over the previous year, according to the Natural Marketing Institute.

    Retail sales within the U.S. consumer packaged goods health-and-wellness industry reached almost $125 billion in 2009, representing an overall growth of 5 percent over the previous year, according to the Natural Marketing Institute. These findings are part of Harleyville, Pa.-based NMI’s annual “Health & Wellness Trends Database” (HWTD) research study, conducted in the fourth quarter of 2009 among 5,607 U.S. households.

    While functional/fortified foods and beverages continue to account for the largest portion of sales, this category had the smallest growth rate — just 2 percent — over 2008. The majority of other categories also experienced growth rates in the single digits, ranging from 5 percent to 8 percent. The notable exception to this was the natural/organic general merchandise category, which, for the second consecutive year, saw double-digit growth of 15 percent. NMI attributed the growth of this category, which includes, pet products, clothing and household cleaning products, chiefly to the proliferation of such products in mainstream shopping channels.

    Based on consumer spending by product segment, consumer penetration/usage trends, and projected data, industry retail dollars in billions for 2009 (and growth vs. 2008) are as follows, according to the institute’s study:

    —Functional/fortified foods and beverages: $41 (2 percent)
    —Vitamins, minerals, herbal and dietary supplements: $25 (8 percent)
    —Organic foods/beverages: $25 (5 percent)
    —Natural foods/beverages: $15 (5 percent)
    —Natural/organic personal care: $10 (8 percent)
    —Natural/organic general merchandise: $9 (15 percent)

    “The economic crisis has affected consumer shopping for health and wellness,” noted NMI president Maryellen Molyneaux. “Many have changed what, where and how they buy. These changes are not short term but are lifestyle changes that could impact the industry into the future. Based on our research and analysis, NMI projects that the health-and-wellness industry will grow at a rate of approximately 3 percent to 15 percent across various categories in 2010.”

    Further information will be available in NMI’s upcoming “11th Edition Health & Wellness Trends Report.” To learn more, visit www.NMIsolutions.com.

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