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    Americans Eating More at Home, But Still Relying on Restaurants, Says NPD

    The market research firm also said Americans are trying to trim their food budgets as well as their waists.

    Americans are eating more at home, but that doesn't mean they're using restaurants less, saccording to the 23rd Annual Report on Eating Patterns in America by market researchers The NPD Group.

    "This is a time of high anxiety for food marketers," says Harry Balzer, NPD's v.p., chief industry analyst and an author of Eating Patterns in America. "It's clear that what Americans say they are doing to deal with rising food prices is not always what they are really doing."

    In addition to addressing how Americans are coping with rising food costs, the latest edition of Eating Patterns in America reveals what and where Americans eat, how they're trimming food costs and their waists, who prepares what they eat, which appliances they use to prepare food, the most popular foods at each meal, the types of restaurants growing in popularity and what menu items are ordered most frequently.
     
    Among the trends Balzer identified for the latest Eating Patterns in America:
    - Breakfast bars and yogurt hit a new high at breakfast, but stopping at restaurants for breakfast also hit a new high this year.
     - Americans are losing interest in losing weight as dieting hits a new low this year.
     - Snacking is not as impulsive as many believe. Most snacks are planned more than six hours earlier. There is a shift in when the most snacking occurs -- more in the morning and less in the evening.
     - Probiotics is the "new" health topic, as concerns about trans fat fades.
     - Winter is becoming a new grilling season.
     
    For more information, visit http://www.npd.com/.

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