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    'Misfit' Produce Shines at Associated Food Stores

    Former oddballs emerge as tasty treasures

    By Meg Major, EnsembleIQ

    The ugly fruit and veggie movement is on a roll, with the latest adopters surfacing in five of Salt Lake City-based Associated Food Stores' corporate Fresh Market, Dan’s and Macey’s stores, courtesy of a new "Misfits" produce program from Robinson Fresh.

    Targeting value- and eco-minded consumers with a "treasure hunt" approach, the unattractive produce – which is every bit as tasty and nutritious as its pristine counterparts – is priced at an attractive discount.

    “The Misfit produce area will be a treasure hunt for guests," affirms Leigh Vaughn, senior produce category manager with Associated Food Stores. "This week, we have six Misfit produce items all at an incredible price: red and green bell peppers, yellow squash, zucchini, mandarins and navel oranges," explains Vaughn. "Next week, we’ll be adding avocados and limes into the mix."

    Misfits produce – which will be available in Associated Retail Operations' Fresh Market Park City and South Ogden, Dan’s Foothill and Olympus and Macey’s Provo stores – will be offered to guests year-round, adds Vaughn, although the variety of produce will vary depending on the season and availability. In any event, shoppers will be encouraged to check the Misfit produce area often, as the variety will change frequently.

    “Robinson Fresh is proud to collaborate with retailers who are helping to combat food waste and raise awareness about this growing issue,” notes Drew Schwartzhoff, director of marketing at Eden Prairie, Minn.-based Robinson Fresh. “Our hope is that through Misfits, we can change the way that the world views imperfect fruits and vegetables.”

    Several different factors affect the appearance of fruits and vegetables. Inconsistent variables during growth like weather, temperature, water amounts and sunlight can change the appearance of produce. And while the appearance may be strange, the taste and quality of the produce is not compromised.

     

     

     

    By Meg Major, EnsembleIQ
    • About Meg Major Veteran supermarket industry journalist Meg Major brings a wealth of experience to her role as Chief Content Editor of Progressive Grocer. In addition to her editorial duties, Major also spearheads the retail food industry’s premier women’s leadership recognition platform, Top Women in Grocery. Follow her on Twitter at @Meg_Major, connect with her on LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/in/megmajor, or email her at [email protected]

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