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    Method, Terracycle Help Clean Up the Planet

    Shoppers can send in soap refill packs to bypass landfills and aid nonprofits.

    Method, a provider of premium, eco-friendly household and personal care products, and upcycling innovator TerraCycle Inc. have teamed up to enable families to recycle their used packaging. Members of the Method Refill Brigade collect their used soap refill packaging and send it to TerraCycle. For each unit of packaging they receive, TerraCycle and Method will pay 2 cents to a charity of the collector’s choice. The collected packaging will then be turned into trash cans, coolers and other home goods.

    “At Method, we make sure we’re using safe and sustainable materials, and that our products are manufactured responsibly,” noted Adam Lowry, co-founder of the San Francisco-based brand. “That doesn’t stop at our packaging. We make most of our bottles from 100 percent recycled plastic, and we want to make sure once all of our bottles and pouches are empty, there is a way for them to be recycled.”

    TerraCycle is a global leader in collecting difficult-to-recycle packaging and upcycling it -- recycling it into new products -- through processes that have been independently rated as among the world’s most carbon-saving waste solutions. Through unique free fundraising programs known as “Brigades,” TerraCycle and its sponsors pay an incentive for people to send in their packaging. To date, more than 1.8 billion pieces of waste have been kept out of landfills, nearly $2 million has been paid to schools and nonprofits, and almost 70,000 locations are sending their packaging to TerraCycle.

    “Method … has become such an iconic brand in 10 years, not only for its products, but also for its packaging,” said Tom Szaky, CEO of Trenton, N.J.-based TerraCycle. “Its customers are already interested in protecting their environment, inside and out, and we hope customers will see how easy it is to send us the packaging instead of to their local landfills.”

     

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