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    Nash Finch 'Feeds Kids Imaginations' with Major Book Donation

    As part of its Feeding Imagination educational program, Nash Finch Co.’s charitable giving organization demonstrated its commitment to literacy by donating reading books for children to 12 Twin Cities organizations.

    As part of its Feeding Imagination educational program, Nash Finch Co.’s charitable giving organization demonstrated its commitment to literacy by donating reading books for children to 12 Twin Cities organizations.

    The Minneapolis-based food distributor’s NFC Foundation has donated 12,000 books to a wide range of organizations including charter schools, nonprofits, and the Minnesota Literacy Council. The latest donation brings the total number of books donated by the company to nearly 60,000 – a significant accomplishment since the launch of the Feeding Imagination Program just two years ago.

    NFC Foundation launched the educational Feeding Imagination initiative in 2006 to provide reading books to elementary school children, especially in areas with a high degree of poverty and need.

    “During this challenging economic time, many corporations may feel the need to pull back on their community involvement,” said Alec Covington, Nash Finch’s president/c.e.o. “We want to demonstrate that it is more important than ever to continue giving back to our community. Reading is essential to creating the strong leaders and healthy economic infrastructure of tomorrow.”

    Nash Finch senior executives were on hand for a community kickoff event with local officials, many of whom read to the children.
     
    “This is the fourth Feeding Imagination event sponsored by Nash Finch,” said Brian Numainville, Nash Finch’s sr. director, research/public relations and NFC chairman. “We also collect books on an ongoing basis through our retail stores, our distribution centers, and at our corporate office. In the last two years, these donations helped us to give children access to books that otherwise simply might not have been available.”

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