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    Iowa Grocers Call for More Curbside Recycling

    DES MOINES, Iowa -The Iowa Grocery Industry Association (IGIA) is spearheading an effort to promote recycling with consumers.

    DES MOINES, Iowa -The Iowa Grocery Industry Association (IGIA) is spearheading an effort to promote recycling with consumers.

    Phase one of the program, themed "It's Easy to Recycle," is already visible in stores across the state, and stresses the ease with which people can curbside recycle water bottles, sport drink bottles, and other clear plastics.

    The campaign, which includes a poster series, shelf talkers, and other store display items, encourages consumers to "just bin" those clear plastics. As the program progresses, retailers will emphasize the ease with which other materials can also be recycled at the curb.

    To promote recycling, the IGIA has formed a coalition of Iowa food retailers including Hy-Vee, Fareway, Dahl's Foods, Wal-Mart, Kum and Go, and Caseys, as well as smaller independent retailers from across the state.

    "Marketing research conducted by the IGIA indicated that many consumers were unaware that their clear plastics could be recycled at the curb," said Jerry Fleagle, IGIA president. "That's why we chose to start here. However, we want to work with our customers to think about what is going to happen to all types of packaging."

    In addition to the point-of-purchase display items, the group has launched a consumer education Web site that provides more recycling information. The site's address is www.itseasytorecycle.org.

    Fleagle said the campaign will encourage Iowans to recycle more materials at the curb, but also challenges communities to offer and/or expand their curbside recycling options. "Curbside recycling benefits everyone. But today, curbside offerings are inconsistent across the state. It's time for Iowa to step up and lead the nation in this area," said Fleagle.

    Noting that the grocery industry is the point of purchase for so many recyclable materials, Fleagle said, "It makes sense for us to serve in this educational role
    and challenge consumers to think about what they_re going to do with those
    beverage containers, boxes, and other recyclable packages after they've
    purchased and consumed the products."

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