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    Seafood Consumption Dipped in '05: NFI

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Seafood consumption in America was 16.2 pounds per capita in 2005, according to the National Fisheries Institute (NFI), which was down slightly from 16.6 pounds in 2004.

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Seafood consumption in America was 16.2 pounds per capita in 2005, according to the National Fisheries Institute (NFI), which was down slightly from 16.6 pounds in 2004.

    However, overall consumption of seafood has risen 9.5 percent from 14.8 pounds in 2001, the institute said. Overall, seafood consumption totaled 4.78 billion pounds (edible weight) for the year.

    "Heart disease and obesity-related illnesses are killing our nation's men and women; it is essential that Americans enjoy more healthy fish meals as part of a balanced diet," said NFI president John Connelly. "Following the federal government advice and that of the American Heart Association and American Dietetic Association to eat seafood at least twice a week can help combat these diseases."

    Shrimp continued to lead in types of seafood Americans are consuming, down just 0.1 pounds per person to 4.1 pounds in 2005. Canned tuna remained in second place on the list of the top ten items consumed, at 3.1 pounds per capita. Holding steady in the number three slot, salmon rose by 13 percent in 2005, while farm-raised tilapia also continued to grow, up 21 percent over 2004. From 2003-2004, the mild white fish jumped from ninth place to sixth place, where it remains for 2005.

    The top ten items, in order of consumption, in 2005: shrimp; canned tuna; salmon, pollock; catfish; cod; crab; clams; tilapia; and scallops.

    The top ten list was compiled for the National Fisheries Institute by H.M. Johnson & Associates, publishers of the Annual Report on the United States Seafood Industry. The consumption data was sourced from NOAA Fisheries.

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