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    Research Shows Almonds as Antioxidant-Heavy as Green Tea, Broccoli

    MODESTO, Calif. -- The Almond Board of California here said the findings of a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry show almonds contain antioxidant levels similar to green tea and broccoli.

    MODESTO, Calif. -- The Almond Board of California here said the findings of a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry show almonds contain antioxidant levels similar to green tea and broccoli.

    The researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University performed a groundbreaking study on the amount of antioxidant compounds in California almonds. The study found that a serving of almonds contains a comparable amount of antioxidants called flavonoids as a serving of broccoli or a cup of brewed black or green tea.

    Previous research has demonstrated that the vitamin E found naturally in almonds, together with the flavonoids found in almond skins, work synergistically to prevent LDL, or "bad," cholesterol from being oxidized. In fact, this study found that vitamin E and almond flavonoids were more effective together than when they were administered separately. These findings further demonstrate how the nutrients in whole foods such as almonds can positively impact health.

    In addition to its high antioxidant content, a one-ounce, 160-calorie handful of almonds is an excellent source of vitamin E and magnesium, a good source of protein and fiber, and offers heart-healthy monounsaturated fat, potassium, calcium, phosphorous, and iron.

    "Almonds lend a healthy halo and added appeal to a variety of food products," said Harbinder Maan, manager of foodservice and industrial marketing for the Almond Board of California. "In addition to the antioxidant benefits of almonds, their taste, texture and visual appeal help food manufacturers develop products that are both healthful and flavorful."

    In fact, 90 percent of consumers said they felt foods with almonds are "more nutritious" than those without; more than 80 percent said almonds add interest and appeal to food products, according to Consumer Attitudes, Awareness and Usage (AAU) research commissioned by the Almond Board of California in 2005.

    For more information visit http://www.AlmondsAreIn.com.

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