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    AMI Food Safety, Facility Design Efforts Recognized by ASAE

    WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The American Meat Institute (AMI) here was named to the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) 2006 Associations Advance America Honor Roll, in recognition of its food safety education efforts and its sanitary facility design principles.

    WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The American Meat Institute (AMI) here was named to the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) 2006 Associations Advance America Honor Roll, in recognition of its food safety education efforts and its sanitary facility design principles.

    ASAE annually recognizes associations that help propel America forward through innovative programs that have a powerful impact on everyday life.

    AMI's food safety education program includes its consumer education Web site, meatsafety.org/poultrysafety.org; a consumer brochure about safe handling, and its print and broadcast media outreach efforts that have helped educate consumers about safe handling practices, thermometer use during cooking, sodium nitrite safety, and other key topics.

    The Institute's Facility Design Task Force (FDTF) developed AMI's Sanitary Design Principles for Facilities. Eleven sanitary design principles endorsed by AMI have become the standards by which new and existing facility designs are judged by architects, construction firms and processors. The principles address the redesigning (remodeling, renovation) of existing facilities or in the construction of new facilities.

    The FDTF prepared a checklist tool to define specific criteria associated with each of the sanitary design principles and facilitate internal and external evaluation of equipment and facility designs. AMI has engaged in an educational effort since that time to encourage their implementation.

    "We are honored to be recognized for these efforts, especially as we celebrate our centennial," said AMI president J. Patrick Boyle. "We share ASAE's view -- that associations can be a force for positive change. By making key issues like food safety noncompetitive, we've been able to leverage the collective knowledge of industry members to enhance safety and educate the public."

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