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    Lowes Foods Recognized by EPA for Energy Conservation

    WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Winston-Salem, N.C.-based Lowes Foods has been honored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for its efforts to reduce energy consumption.

    WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Winston-Salem, N.C.-based Lowes Foods has been honored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for its efforts to reduce energy consumption. Five of the company's supermarkets have received the Energy Star label, which recognizes buildings that are among the top 25 percent in the nation in terms of energy performance. Lowes Foods has also been named an Energy Star partner, reflecting its commitment to the continuous improvement of the organization's energy performance.

    "Reducing energy consumption is a priority for Lowes Foods," said Gary Watson, VP for business support at Lowes Foods. "It takes a tremendous amount of energy to operate a supermarket -- for lights, refrigeration, and to run computerized checkout systems. By finding ways to eliminate energy use, we contribute to a healthier environment in the neighborhoods in which we do business, and operate our stores more efficiently."

    Energy conservation measures put in place by Lowes Foods include using the latest technology for HVAC, air-intake systems and refrigerated cases, motion sensors and time clocks to regulate light fixtures and appliances, and building materials that provide maximum insulation.

    The conservation measures put in place by Lowes Foods will save enough energy to power 444 homes for one year and result in a reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by nearly 10,000 tons annually.

    The Lowes Foods stores that have received the Energy Star label are located in Chapel Hill, Clayton, Cornelius, Wilmington and Winston-Salem, N.C.

    Lowes Foods is in the process of having additional stores certified by the EPA for the Energy Star label. In addition, each new store built by Lowes Foods is being designed to meet the Energy Star criteria. The company opened five stores this year and has plans to open another six in 2003. These stores use nearly 50 percent less power for their light systems than is allowed by current standards.

    The EPA introduced Energy Star in 1992 as a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, in order to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. EPA partnered with the US Department of Energy in 1996 to promote the Energy Star label. Energy Star has expanded to cover new homes, most of the buildings sector, residential heating and cooling equipment, major appliances, office equipment, lighting and consumer electronics.

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