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    Schnucks Closing 2 Rockford Stores

    Grocer to change up dining options at other area stores

    By Jim Dudlicek, EnsembleIQ

    St. Louis-based Schnuck Markets Inc. plans to close two of its Rockford, Ill., supermarkets while making some changes to the prepared foods options at two other stores in that area that will remain open.

    Schnucks will close its Alpine Road and Rural Street stores by the end of the month. The stores' combined 139 associates will be offered positions at neighboring Schnucks stores. Company leaders say low sales and the costly operation of these two older, smaller facilities factored heavily into this decision.

    Also in the Rockford area, Schnucks closed the in-store restaurants and restructured related areas within its two largest stores, resulting in the elimination of 15 full- and part-time positions at its East State market and nine full- and part-time positions at its Loves Park store. “In order to stay competitive and offer the value our customers want and need, we are discontinuing services currently underutilized by the majority of our customers," said Schnucks President and CEO Todd Schnuck said. "Eliminating positions is always a last resort, but these are directly related to the closed functions and could not be absorbed.”

    Schnucks' Pizza Still Popular

    But the popular pizzerias at these locations will remain open. "Iin fact, we are expanding the menu selection," Schnuck said. "In order to ensure the continuation of excellent dining experiences, the in-store seating areas will remain."

    Family-owned Schnuck Markets Inc. currently operates 10 stores in the Rockford area, among its 101 stores and 95 in-store pharmacies in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin and Iowa.

    By Jim Dudlicek, EnsembleIQ
    • About Jim Dudlicek As editor-in-chief of Progressive Grocer, Jim Dudlicek oversees daily operations of the magazine, spearheads its signature features, produces PG’s monthly Trend Alert newsletter on center store issues, moderates its regular webcast series, and writes and comments about a wide range of grocery issues. A food industry journalist since 2002, Jim came to PG in June 2010 after covering the dairy industry for 7½ years, during which time he served as chief editor of Dairy Field and Dairy Foods magazines. A graduate of Marquette University, Jim is fascinated by how truly progressive grocers inspire consumers to enjoy food, transforming the industry from mere merchants into educators that can take the most basic of all necessities and turn it into something profound and life-enhancing.

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