Quick Stats

Quick Stats

    You are here

    Online Grocery Study Finds Center Store Food, Nonfoods 'Doing Well'

    Willard Bishop delivers 1st comprehensive 'SuperStudy'

    By Meg Major, EnsembleIQ

    Willard Bishop's recently-released 2015 eCommerce SuperStudy sheds some much-needed light on the value of online grocery shopping programs from both the retailer and supplier perspective, particularly in the areas of financial metrics, category performances and shopper behaviors.

    The new study, which benchmarks category performance and ranks manufacturers’ performance across four leading click-and-mortar retailers, provides fresh insights on grocery e-commerce, including a list of top-tier CPG manufacturers that are winning the fair-share-battle for food and non-food sales within the digital marketplace.

    Paul Weitzel, managing partner at Willard Bishop, said, “Overall, center store food and non-food categories are doing very well online; however, the different fulfillment models cause category performance to vary significantly. The online trip averages 44 units per order 90 percent of the time, when the basket is more than 50 units. Online orders are large and broad," Weitzel continues, "and consumers are shopping the entire store, which is very different than traditional in-store baskets, which are much smaller and more specific. You get fewer cherry pickers online [alongside] core customers shopping for convenience; they are profitable and very important."

    'Paper Products Twice as Important Online'

    Interestingly, he notes, "Some categories are disproportionately more important online," a good example being paper products, "which are twice as important online than in-store. This is a category that many grocers gave away to mass and club and e-commerce is showing that they can win back some of this business."

    Among the categories that are trending stronger than others, Weitzel says, "Frozen foods indexes the highest online on a fair share basis among all store departments. Temperature state is not an issue. In addition, consumers are accepting someone else picking out their fresh product," which Weitzel says "is no longer an issue for most core online shoppers."

    However, different fulfillment models cause category performance to vary significantly. "Some categories are also disproportionately more important for home deliveries versus store pick-up programs. Express-lane pick-up locations tend to be soccer moms with two kids in the back seat, so family, children's and baby categories index really high at these locations. Stores that offer home deliveries see higher sales for categories that cater more to the elderly population."

    By Meg Major, EnsembleIQ
    • About Meg Major Veteran supermarket industry journalist Meg Major brings a wealth of experience to her role as Chief Content Editor of Progressive Grocer. In addition to her editorial duties, Major also spearheads the retail food industry’s premier women’s leadership recognition platform, Top Women in Grocery. Follow her on Twitter at @Meg_Major, connect with her on LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/in/megmajor, or email her at [email protected]

    Related Content

    Related Content