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    6 Ways Food Retailers Can Use Customer Experience Data

    Improve business by grasping shoppers’ needs

    By Dale Roberts, Clarabridge

    Consumers make an average of 83 trips to the supermarket per year, according to Consumer Reports. With 52 percent of consumers reporting to PricewaterhouseCoopers that they return to a grocery store based on the in-store experience, it’s important that retailers pay attention to what customers are saying, to build customer loyalty and retain business over time. Understanding what your customers are saying about your store, your employees and your products can help not only to optimize elements of your customer experience, but also to mitigate any risk of losing your customers to a competitor or even facing legal action.

    Layering this type of customer feedback on top of the point-of-sale and CRM data you already have offers a holistic understanding of who your customer is, and how she’s experiencing the in-store environment. Here are six ways customer experience data can help shed light on what is, and what isn’t, working for your customers.

    1) Identify the Struggling Departments

    With so many departments in a store, it’s unlikely that they’re all performing at the same high level necessary for success, regardless of how much effort you may believe is being invested. Looking at customer experience data can point your management team to specific areas of the grocery store that may have poor quality or poor customer service, and then focus in on what changes are necessary for improvement. By keeping track of store-wide performance, both at the departmental and the regional level, you can ensure that no one area is dragging down the overall experience.

    2) Demonstrate the real value in promotions

    Purchasing data will let your team know what promotions and coupons are popular with your shopper base. By looking into customer feedback data, it’s possible to know not only if customers appreciate certain promotions, but why those promotions are valued. For instance, are your shoppers buying a certain product because that specific brand is a favorite, and perhaps your purchasing team can investigate other items from the same brand? Or are shoppers brand-agnostic when it comes to that product type, and promotions can be used to move excess inventory?

    By Dale Roberts, Clarabridge
    • About Dale Roberts Dale Roberts is VP professional services at Reston, Va.-based software company Clarabridge.

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