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    Whole Foods Donates Globally and Locally to Counter Food Bank Shortages

    The natural grocer is giving nearly $1 million in food to local food banks, poorest Native American reservations, and Myanmar relief efforts.

    Austin, Texas-based Whole Foods Market said on Wednesday it has joined forces with Conscious Alliance, an emerging nonprofit run by 20-somethings, to distribute more than 400 tons of non-perishable food worth nearly $1 million to local and global partners around the world.

    "At a time when food supplies are at an all-time low at local food banks, we thought a food donation that touched local and global communities was the right thing to do," said Bruce Silverman, Whole Foods v.p. of private label. "Through a partnership with these young entrepreneurs at Conscious Alliance, we have been able to diversify this contribution to support our communities locally through area food banks and Native American reservations, as well as reach out to those affected by the recent cyclone in Myanmar."

    Whole Foods said it's donating nearly $1 million worth of food to Conscious Alliance, which will be distributed to the poorest local and global communities. Local food banks will receive the bulk of the donation through America's Second Harvest. Native American reservations, which exist in six of the seven poorest counties in the U.S., are also receiving food allocated for children and elders. And, donations will help some of the 2.5 million survivors of last month's cyclone that hit Myanmar.

    Food donation distributions have just begun and will continue through the holidays staggered, based on need. Foods such as bulk and store brand items, including canned beans, frozen potatoes, applesauce, frozen berries, pasta sauces, and much more are among donated items.

    Conscious Alliance is a Boulder, Colo.-based national nonprofit that was founded in 2002 and is focused on delivering emergency food relief to the poorest communities in the United States. With three paid employees on staff -- all in their mid-20s -- the group's initial approach to fighting hunger has been organizing "grassroots food drives" at concerts and music festivals.

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