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    Whole Grain Salba Linked to Reductions in Blood Sugar and Appetite

    A new study examining the effects of whole grain Salba (Sahi Alba 911 and 912) has found that it can reduce postprandial glycemia and satiety. The research will be disseminated this weekend at the Salba Smart booth (#2495) at the annual Natural Products Expo West in Anaheim, Calif.

    A new study examining the effects of whole grain Salba (Sahi Alba 911 and 912) has found that it can reduce postprandial glycemia and satiety. The research will be disseminated this weekend at the Salba Smart booth (#2495) at the annual Natural Products Expo West in Anaheim, Calif.
     
    The research, led by Dr. Vladimir Vuksan at the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center at St. Michael’s Hospital, Canada, was presented in the advance online issue of the “European Journal of Clinical Nutrition” (Jan. 20, 2010). The study focused on the effect of escalating doses of Salba on glycemia and satiety. Previous research led by Dr. Vuksan, professor of endocrinology and nutritional sciences in the faculty of medicine, has shown that the consumption of 37 grams/day of Salba improves cardiovascular risk factors by reducing blood pressure, inflammation and coagulation in people with well-controlled Type II diabetes. The new study focused on healthy individuals, and measured their responses to blood glucose and appetite after high, intermediate and low doses of Salba baked into white bread.
     
    Results from the clinical trials found that for each gram of Salba ingested, there was a 2 percent reduction in postprandial glycemia compared with the control, as well as a prolongation of satiety. The researchers concluded that Salba’s high levels of dietary fiber, calcium, magnesium and antioxidants are likely to be the main triggers of these effects, noting a reduction in the rate of nutrient delivery from the stomach to the small intestine, and related effects on after-meal satiety levels. 
     
    “This new research is significant because it helps to explain why and how Salba is effective in reducing the risks of heart disease, and how it can potentially assist in appetite control,” said Rally Ralston, Salba Smart’s managing partner. “We know that whole grains are good for our hearts, and this new clinical evidence points to Salba as a specific whole grain that has proven nutritional benefits,” he noted.
     
    The new research applies only to Salba — the most nutrient-dense variety of Salvia hispanica L. — and not to Chia. Both grains are from the same species, but while Salba is composed of two distinct, registered varieties and grown under strictly controlled conditions in Peru, Chia is made up of many different and unregistered wild strains of the species, the nutritional consistency of which can vary greatly.

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